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How to Help Kids/Children with Dyslexia

Children with Dyslexia

Dyslexia can have a profound impact on a child’s performance in school, especially if it is not diagnosed properly. Instead of getting proper instruction, they may feel inadequate and continuously underperform, building a resentment and negative attitude towards school.

However, there is another way. If the school is educated about the specifics of dyslexia and the needs of the children with dyslexia everywhere, they can try to adapt and actually help these children integrate into the society.

Experts at Pacific Coast Advocates, who help parents and children achieve their rights suggest some of the most effective ways teachers can help children with dyslexia.

Working in Small Groups or Individually

Perhaps the best instruction method for a child with dyslexia is a one-on-one learning because the teacher can devote their full attention to the child and the child’s needs.

However, in practice, this is often impossible or really difficult to achieve. However, working in smaller groups can be very effective, too, and that is something every school and every teacher can do with some help and guidance.

While working in small groups, the teacher can detect the key problem areas, as well as the areas where the child really performs well and devise methods to integrate those in order to help the child.

Working Continuously

In some schools, the needs of children with dyslexia are recognized, but they are approached the wrong way.

The child is still required to attend regular classes and do things in the same way other children do while being taken out of the class once or twice a week for additional instruction or help.

Even though it is a step in the right direction, it is not enough because a child with dyslexia needs this kind of instruction continuously and for all subjects.

Multi-Sensory Methods

One of the best forms of teaching children with dyslexia is the multisensory approach.

If the child has difficulty parsing spoken language, they can have it in writing, which should help them understand the word or sentence.

On the other hand, if the child has a difficulty reading, they can still hear the written word pronounced. This helps to understand and, over time, will lead to the child’s ability to recognize words and sentences to a certain degree.

Repetition Is Important

We all learn through repetition, there’s no doubt about it. However, children with dyslexia may need additional drilling and repetition to establish the correlation between written words and the sounds they make.

Not because they are less intelligent, but because their brains are wired differently and need time to adapt to this particular skill.

Additional Reading:- 5 Useful Websites Every Student Should Know About

Drilling helps create pathways in the child’s brain which will then make it a lot easier for a child to process that same piece of language later on.

Reducing Stress and Anxiety

Very often, children with dyslexia become really anxious when they need to read something because it doesn’t come easily to them.

This, in turn, creates a negative feedback loop in their brains and can put them off education or even reading in general.

However, we all know how important reading is for everyday life, including professional life later on in life.

It is, therefore, the teacher’s job to find a way to reduce the anxiety and the aversion a child has towards reading and writing. Experts often suggest not correcting small mistakes and encouraging any advancement you see in the child.

Working with children with dyslexia do not need to be difficult or complicated as long as you are able to empathize with them and give them the proper tools to express themselves, and that is what a good teacher does.

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